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Iranian students hold gathering to commemorate victims of university bus accident

Students of Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University mourn for their dead comrades
Students of Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University mourn for their dead comrades

Reported by PMOI/MEK

 

Iran. Feb. 3, 2019 - On Saturday, students of the Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University gathered to commemorate 10 students who lost their lives 40 days earlier in a bus accident, a ritual that is part of the Shiite Islam culture.

On December 25, a bus carrying students from the Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University veered off a steep, mountainous road and crashed into a cement block, causing the death of 10 passengers and injuring 28 others.

 

Students of Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University mourn for their dead comrades

Students of Science and Research unit of Tehran’s Azad University mourn for their dead comrades

 

Iranian regime officials first claimed that the incident was due to the bus driver suffering from a heart attack. But it later became evident that the vehicle’s brakes had malfunctioned, causing it to slip off-track.

The infrastructure and equipment of universities and schools in Iran are substandard, and their poor state is threatening the safety of the youth who study in these institutions. In December, a school in Sistan Baluchistan burned down because of a malfunctioning kerosene lamp. Four schoolgirls died in the incident.

The poor state of schools is one of the many aspects of the Iranian regime’s corruption and mismanagement that is triggering protests across Iran. Teachers, students and parents have been protesting that while the Iranian regime is spending billions on fueling conflicts and violence in neighboring countries, the future generations of Iran are lacking their most basic necessities and services.

 

Customers of undelivered vehicles hold demonstrations in front of ministry offices

Customers of Iran Khordro vehicle manufacturer gathered in front of the offices of the industry ministry in Tehran and protested to the increase of the prices of vehicles they had registered for.

The protesters were chanting, “Are you asleep or awake? Who’s the thief? Iran Khodro.”

 

 

 

 

In 2018, Iran Khodro encouraged customers to pre-register for its new vehicles at discount prices. Thousands of Iranians made early deposits in hopes of later receiving their vehicles. But months, later, Iran Khodro reneged on its promises and declared that customers will have to purchase their vehicles at regular prices, requiring early buyers to pay the deficit to be eligible for receiving their vehicles. For some customers, this means they have to pay double what they were initially told.

Since then, many customers of the Iran Khodro, which is owned by Iranian regime officials and institutions, have been protesting in front of the stores and exhibition halls of the company and in front of government buildings, demanding the delivery of their purchases or the refund of their deposits.