ANALYSIS: How Iran’s regime enters its 40th year as an Islamic Republic

2/12/2018 9:19:02 AM

Iran Protests Have Violent Night; at Least 50 Dead Overall

Iran Protests Have Violent Night; at Least 50 Dead Overall

‌‌BY: Heshmat Alavi

Al Arabiya , 12 February 2018--  February 11 marked the beginning of the 40th year Iran's clerics are ruling over what they describe as an 'Islamic Republic.'

The fact that this regime is facing a whirlwind of domestic and foreign crises goes beyond doubt. While Tehran's state media boasts massive support among the populace, remarks heard recently from Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei portray a canvas of impasse, a weak entity and the road ahead being uphill, to say the least.

In response to increasing unrest across the country protesting political and economic corruption, Khamenei acknowledged the fact that 'fighting cruelty and corruption is very difficult… it will not be resolved easily.'

He is acknowledging the growing scope of systematic corruption riddling the ruling apparatus, and his regime's weakness in tackling such a demanding issue. Khamenei's words also indicate Iran's population will no longer tolerate discrimination, injustice and state-sponsored corruption.

Interesting is how in his latest remarks Khamenei refuses to discuss the 120-day ultimatum issued by U.S. President Donald Trump over the fate of the Iran nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. This further shows his weak hand, especially since Europe is cooperating with Washington's demands of taking on Tehran's meddling across the Middle East and ballistic missile program.

 Khamenei's silence is very meaningful and will be devastating for his regime in the near future.

 

 'Systemized corruption'

 

Political and economic corruption is now considered institutionalized in Iran's governing systems, ranking this country as one of the world's most corrupts states. Obviously, economic corruption is merely one result of political corruption, and after 40 years we have come to learn the very subject of corruption has become an inseparable aspect of Iran's regime.

Iranian Vice President Es'hagh Jahangiri says 'termite corruption' is infecting every essence of Iran's political and economic infrastructure, while Ahmad Tavakoli, head of Iran's Expediency Council goes further.

'Unfortunately, corruption has become systematic. If measures are not taken, corruption will most definitely bring an end to the Islamic republic,' he adds, cited by the semi-official Tasnim news agency.

  

Changing times

  

Once known for its chest-thumping in refusing to discuss its role in the internal affairs of countries across the Middle East and the so-called 'defensive' ballistic missile program, Iran, sensing the changing times, is now signaling steps back in this regard.

In a public acknowledgment of increasing international pressures and Europe distancing away from Iran, Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi said in Paris how Tehran would be willing to discuss 'other issues' if the West makes certain the JCPOA remains 'a successful experience.'

Although these remarks may seem rather harsh, those familiar with the language used by Iranian officials understand this is saber-rattling to save face, knowing discussions over 'other issues' will be grueling and far more demanding than anything Tehran experienced during the Obama years.

Obvious is how Iran's hardliners fiercely oppose such talks, yet all parties of this factionalized regime are realizing there is no good option ahead, and only choosing from bad and worse.

With Trump providing a last chance for what he describes as 'the worst deal ever,' the Europe trio of Britain, France and Germany, all seeking to preserve the JCPOA due to their economic interests in Iran, are scrambling to blueprint a plan addressing Trump's concerns over Tehran's destructive role in the Middle East and ballistic missile drive.

  

Dirty money

 

Despite Araqchi's claim of there being no link between the Iran nuclear accord and its influence across the region, new evidence shows the U.S. government tracing portions of the $1.7 billion released by the Obama administration to Tehran – as part of the JCPOA signing – has found its way into the hands of Iran-supported terrorists.

Informed sources are indicating how Tehran has been allocating such funds to pay members of the Lebanese Hezbollah, known as Iran's main proxy group and provide the budget needed for the Quds Force, the Revolutionary Guards element described as Iran's leading foreign intelligence arm involved also in covert action.

The Houthis of Yemen should also be sending their gratitude to Team Obama as evidence shows they, too, have received dividends of the notorious cash load airlifted to Iran. Tehran is using the Houthis to exert pressure on Riyadh from its own backyard.

This is not good news for Iran as such findings will most likely further convince Trump in his effort against the JCPOA. As heard from Araqchi, Tehran understands perfectly well the scrapping of this accord and the return of crippling sanctions, coupled with ongoing domestic protests, are a recipe for disaster.

  

Troubling months

 

In another sign of the Trump administration's determination to take on the issue of Iran's belligerence, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is in the region, paying visits to Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon, Egypt and Kuwait.

Iran is most definitely a major topic of his discussions and Tehran is bracing for possibly a new onslaught of regional pressure, similar to that of Europe, making costing demands.

With Iran protests taking a toll on the regime – as seen on Sunday with many cities witnessing people boycotting pro-regime rallies and protesters hitting the streets at night – and increasing word of banks going bankrupt, the months ahead look grim for Iran. This regime understands better than anyone that the public's increasing wrath will be demanding, and it is using the JCPOA, its regional influence and ballistic missile program to bargain with the international community.

The difference between now and 2015 is that the White House is not at all fond of Iran's bellicosity, and more importantly, the Iranian people are making serious demands of regime change.

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