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Kazerun protests: The bigger picture

The city of Kazerun, home to continuing protests for days now, with no end in sight.
The city of Kazerun, home to continuing protests for days now, with no end in sight.

Analysis by PMOI/MEK

 

May 19, 2018 - While leaders of the Iranian regime are attempting to save their status quo following the United States’ withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal, the direr matter before the mullahs’ regime is the continuing protests in Iran, and now specifically in the southern city of Kazerun, home to continuing protests for days now, with no end in sight.

On Friday, Daily Mail wrote at least two individuals are reportedly killed and six others injured in Kazrun’s unrest. Anti-riot police have entered the city and activists are chanting slogans against the regime, the piece adds.

One can be mistaken to think the Kazerun protests are merely about a regime plan to divide the city in two. This is what the Iranian regime intends to canvas for the outside world.

 

What is the truth?

 

One certain individual involved in the Iranian regime’s decision-making process is Mullah Nategh Nouri, a member of the Iranian regime’s Expediency Council.

“The Islamic Republic challenge status quo is far beyond the Iran nuclear deal,” he said, according to local media.

 

 

Mullah Nategh Nouri

 

 

Political analysts writing in the Iranian regime’s main newspapers have acknowledged similar analysis.

“In the events, such as the scenes we are witnessing in the past few days in Kazerun, maybe lesser people will actually believe this high volume of dissent is merely due to land division. We must be on high alert inside the country,” said Ali Khorram of Etemad daily on Saturday.

This should come to the attention of those who claimed Iran’s Dec/Jan uprising was a short episode and died down.

It is worth noting the protests of Baneh in western Iran, Isfahan’s farmers in central Iran, protests in Ahvaz of southwest Iran, teachers in Tehran and the increasing number of credit firm clients demanding their savings back from corrupt state institutions.

Iran is not a country where protests come to a halt. Such measures will continue until this regime is toppled.

This is the bigger picture of Kazerun’s protests.